Badger Badger Badger Badger

It’s 2003, I’m (counts on fingers) … old enough to find this ridiculous, but the internet has finally bestowed a Flash(!) animated meme by British animator Jonti Picking.

According to Wikipedia…”It consists of 12 animated cartoon badgers doing calisthenics, a mushroom in front of a tree, and a snake in the desert. The Flash cartoon is accompanied by a bass line, above which a voiceover sings the names of what’s shown on screen.”

Some of you may even remember it. Like Monty Python, you either found it hilarious, or just plain old didn’t get it.

Stop that, it’s silly

So why am I sharing this memory? Well…I’ve never seen a badger apart from at the side of the road, on the tellybox, or in crazy internet memes. Until now that is.

I was lucky enough to see my very first badger first hand. Such incredible creatures – dainty they ain’t, but what they lack in subtlety they make up for in character. I could hear the little nose snuffling along the ground before I even saw it. Just absolutely adorable, and I knew I had to draw her.

What’s even more wonderful is that meanwhile, my friend in The Alps in France had spotted a badger too! She told me about the time a Romani Gypsy Shaman told her that they see black and white animals as sacred because they signify the cross over between this and the other world.

Moreover, the badger appears to remind us to have faith in our own abilities, to be fearless and persistent with truth, tenacity of boldness. The black and white (and lots of floofy grey!) of the badger mirrors the journey I’m exploring about duality and contrasts, juxtapositions and combinations.

I drew the badger so that she had a reflection in the water because I wanted to honour the French badger (Belle) my friend crossed paths with at the same time as I did my British girl (Bella) – the water signifying the Channel.

Badger drawing